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Common Disorders


Heel Pain, Heel Spurs and Plantar Fasciitis

A common foot complaint is pain in the bottom of the heel. This is often referred to as heel spurs or plantar fasciitis. It commonly is painful the first few steps in the morning or after rest. It tends to get worse the longer one stands during the day. It is caused by subtle changes in foot structure that occurs over time. These changes result in the gradual flattening of the arch. As this occurs a thick ligament (the plantar fascia) that is attached to the bottom of the heel and fans out into the ball of the foot is stretched excessively. This ligament acts as a shock absorber while walking. As the foot flattens it stretches. If it stretches too much it gets inflamed and causes pain. Over time the pull of the ligament creates a spur on the heel bone. It is important to realize that it is not the spur that causes the pain and therefore the spur does not need to be removed in most cases. This condition may also cause generalized arch pain called plantar fasciitis. This is an inflammation of the plantar fascial ligament.

A common factor that contributes to this condition is tightness of the calf muscles. Women who wear high heels and people who walk for exercise will often develop this problem because of the tightness that results in the calf muscle as a result of these activities. A non-supportive shoe also contributes to this problem. Weight gain is another factor in developing heel pain.

Home Treatments

Stretching

Calf muscle stretching is very useful. The typical runners stretch by leaning into a wall is helpful. An alternative method of stretching is to stand approximately two feet from a wall. Facing the wall turn your feet inward so you are pigeon toed. Lean forward into the wall keeping your heels on the floor and the knees extended. Also keep your back straight and do not bend at the hips. Hold the stretch for 10 seconds and do the stretch ten times in a row. Do the stretching three times each day. Always stretch the calf muscles following any form of exercise.

Over the Counter Arch Supports

Wear a supportive sport or walking shoe. This can be supplemented with a good over the counter arch support.

Oral Anti-inflammatory Medications

Medications like Advil, Tylenol, or Aleve may be of some benefit. Always read the medications directions and warnings before use.

Professional Care

If the heel pain persists your foot doctor may suggest a cortisone injection, taping the foot to support the arch, night splints to stretch the calf muscles at night while you are sleeping or functional foot orthotics. On occasion surgery may be required to cure this condition. Orthotics should be tried before surgery and should be used following the surgical procedure (See surgical treatment of plantar heel pain).

Article provided by PodiatryNetwork.com.

Medical Disclaimer: All information contained on the NorthTownPodiatry.com website is intended for informational and educational purposes. The information is not intended nor suited to be a replacement or substitute for professional medical treatment or for professional medical advice relative to a specific medical question or condition. We urge you to always seek the advice of your physician or medical professional with respect to your medical condition or questions. As a recipient of information from this website, you are not establishing a doctor/patient relationship with any physician. There is no replacement for personal medical treatment and advice from your personal physician.


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